Techniques

Ballet
Pointe
Acro
Jazz
Hip Hop
Lyrical
Tap
Contemporary
Modern
Musical Theater
Improv/Choreography

 

Intro to Dance

Creative Movement
Ballet/Tap Combo 
Ballet/Jazz Combo

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to secure hair into a bun

You will need a brush, one hair elastic, and about a dozen bobby pins, depending on length and thickness of hair. A hair net and hair spray should be used for performances. Large hair pins, comb, and hair gel as needed.

1. Lightly dampen hair (or comb out freshly washed hair), comb or brush through.

2. Smooth hair back from the face with a brush, secure hair tightly in a ponytail with an elastic band. Position pony tail where you want the bun to be. (For spring recital, ballet classes will have a high bun, angled from the line of the chin. Buns for winter performance may be low, center, or high.)

3. Twist the ponytail into a tight rope. Brushing the ponytail before twisting sometimes helps smooth it out.

4. Continue twisting, wrapping the ponytail around the elastic band. Tuck the ends of the ponytail under the wrapped bun.

5. For performance, use a hair net to cover the bun. (Hairspray or a "bun cover" can be used for ballet class.)

6. Secure the bun with pins. Large hair pins are helpful for long, thick hair. 

7. For performance, spray the bun and the hair around the face. Use pins and gel to slick bangs back.

For an alternative way to make a perfectly shaped bun, you will need all of the previously mentioned tools as well as a hair "donut," available at beauty supply stores. Make sure to use a generous amount of bobby pins as well.  For instructions, follow this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=882m4QKu0sg

Voila! A perfect dancer's bun!

 

How to apply make-up for the stage

Dancers wear make-up on stage so that their features are visible from the audience. Make-up should be worn by all dancers for the recital.  For very young children, eyeliner and mascara can be omitted if it is a traumatic experience!  False eyelashes are recommended for older dancers but not required. For additional step-by-step instructions with pictures, follow this link: http://dance.about.com/od/youngdancers/ss/Stage_Makeup.htm

1. Start with a clean face, then apply liquid or pressed foundation and set with powder.  Try to match skin tone as closely as possible.

2. Brush blush along the cheek bones in an upward motion and on the apples of the cheeks. Dark tan, brick, and mauve tones look best.

3. Apply a dark shade of eye shadow on the lid of the eye, followed by one or two other lighter, complementary colors working up to just under the eyebrow.  I like deep purples and browns.  Blue eyeshadow works if it is very dark, light blue may be used in the crease of the eye. (Dancers using false eyelashes should apply them first, so that the eye shadow can help cover the adhesive)

4. Line the upper and lower lids along the lash line with black eyeliner.  Depending on the age of your child, or your preference, you may use liquid or pencil.  I recommend liquid for older dancers.  Liquid also feels better on the young ones, but it smears very easily and may not survive to the stage!  To open the look of the eyes even more, you can extend the top line just beyond the lash.  Older dancers may extend the bottom line as well, just be careful to extend it straight out and not up into the top line (that will have the opposite effect and make the eye look smaller).

5. Curl the lashes (if you choose) and apply mascara or false eyelashes.

6. Use a bright lipstick and blot gently.  A small amount of powder can be used to set the lipstick.  I also recommend using lipliner to line and fill in the lips before applying the lipstick to cut down on needed touch-ups.

Smile, you are ready to go onstage!